How is the “Blitzkrieg” different from the “glubokaya operatsiya”

How is the “Blitzkrieg” different from the “glubokaya operatsiya”

I am asking this question from memory. I remember to keep hearing and reading that the Soviets, in the final stages of WWII, advancing into Germany, have "learned" the "Blitzkrieg" from the Germans. However, they have had developed the "deep operation" strategy, that seems suspiciously similar to the Blitzkrieg to me, before the war. How are both strategies different and have they learned anything in terms of strategy from the Germans?


Wiki seems to be answering your question:

While Blitzkrieg emphasized the importance of a single strike on a Schwerpunkt (focal point) as a means of rapidly defeating an enemy, Deep Battle emphasized the need for multiple breakthrough points and reserves to exploit the breach quickly. The difference in doctrine can be explained by the strategic circumstances for the USSR and Germany at the time. Germany had a smaller population but a better trained army whereas the Soviet Union had a larger population but a more poorly trained army. As a result, the Blitzkrieg emphasized narrow front attacks where quality could be decisive, while Deep Battle emphasized wider front attacks where quantity could be used effectively.

Another aspect of the Soviet strategy is that the reserves are given to the most successful of the multiple directions of offensive. IOW, if unit A, B and C are attacking at three different points, and A is making progress, B is stalled, and C walked into an ambush and is being decimated, then B and C are left to deal with their issues themselves and all possible support is given to A (source). However, this makes such an eminent sense, that I doubt that it is specific to the Soviet Army.